Welcome to the Ecohydrology Lab at UCSB!

Featured

The Tague EcoHydrology lab focuses on watershed research, addressing the feedbacks among terrestrial vegetation, surface hydrological processes, and atmospheric conditions. We use a variety of techniques to examine the impact of changes in climate and land use on ecosystem health and water resources.
Please scroll through our blog below to see what we’ve been up to!

All are welcome to attend our weekly lab meetings and take part in presentations and scientific discussions. See our Lab meeting schedule & events page for information on each week’s topic or presenter. Meetings are held in the Bren hall lab wing, room 1005.

Congratulations Larry Band!

Congratulations to Dr. Lawrence E. Band, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, on being elected as a member of the 2015 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Class of Fellows. Dr. Band is a friend of the Tague Team lab, and was Dr. Tague’s PhD advisor. We congratulate him on this honor.
Read more about the AGU class of fellows

Congratulations Dr. Son!

Last week Kyongho Son successfully defended his PhD dissertation “The importance of sub-watershed variability for predicting ecohydrologic response to inter-annual climate variability and climate warming in California’s Sierra Nevada Watersheds”. Son as been a valuable member of the Tague Team Lab through his research and contributions. Congratulations Dr. Son!

Salience and Wildfire meeting

Principal investigator Naomi Tague, with fellow UCSB professors Sarah Anderson and Andrew Plantinga, led a meeting composed of a group of visiting scholars at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) in Annapolis, Maryland, July 23-24. The meeting brought together environmental, social, and economics scholars to collaborate and develop a new approach to examine the complex linkage among fire management actions such as fuels treatments, fire risk, and post-fire effects, including risks to water resources and other ecosystem services.
SESYNC

Tague quoted in local paper

Dr. Naomi Tague was quoted in an article appearing in the Santa Barbara Independent. The article “Plants and Animals Are Dying for a Drink” appearing in today’s paper discusses drought impacts on local plants, animals, and even economics. Author Tyler Hayden even quotes Tague in the final words of the article – ‘As Tague put it, “What we really should worry about are future droughts.”’
Read the article

Dr. Tague interview on AZoCleantech

Naomi (Christina) Tague was interviewed on AZoCleantech by Alessandro Pirolini, editor of the AZoNetwork, regarding North American forest die-offs that have occurred in recent years. In the interview, Naomi discusses causes and prevention, and the research that grew out of the NCEAS working group and the recent publication that came from that research, “Tree mortality from drought, insects, and their interactions in a changing climate”
Read the interview
Access the paper
National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)
image

Tague interview on NPR

Naomi Tague was interviewed by KCLU’s Lance Orozco about drought and tree mortality in California. The interview comes just after the recent publication in New Phytologist, which Dr. Tague is a co-author – “Tree mortality from drought, insects, and their interactions in a changing climate”. The interview was broadcast on National Public Radio on Friday, June 12.

Listen to the interview

NPRinterviewTREES

New Publication & Press Release

Dr. Tague, as a member of UC Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), collaborated on a new publication that will appear in New Phytologist this month (an early view of the publication is now available online), “Tree mortality from drought, insects, and their interactions in a changing climate”. The study examines the interactions between drought and insects, and their impact on forest health. Dr. Tague appears in a UCSB press release highlighting the study’s research.

Access the paper
UCSB Press Release
NCEAS

Forest die-off Colo

The western U.S. has been a hotspot for forest die-offs such as this one in Colorado. Photo Credit: William M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management

Figure 1. (a) Cumulative mortality rates (% basal area, BA) four major forest types (below) in western US forests averaged over 2000–2013, with fire-caused mortality removed from US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data. (b) Annual mortality rates (% BA yr−1) of major tree species in the western US from US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data. (c) Field-ascribed proximate cause of mortality that crews noted about individual dead trees in Juniperus osteosperma (JUOS), Pinus edulis (PIED), Pinus contorta (PICO), and Populus tremuloides (POTR) (Supporting Information Notes S1).

Figure 1. (a) Cumulative mortality rates (% basal area, BA) four major forest types (below) in western US forests averaged over 2000–2013, with fire-caused mortality removed from US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data. (b) Annual mortality rates (% BA yr−1) of major tree species in the western US from US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data. (c) Field-ascribed proximate cause of mortality that crews noted about individual dead trees in Juniperus osteosperma (JUOS), Pinus edulis (PIED), Pinus contorta (PICO), and Populus tremuloides (POTR) (Supporting Information Notes S1).