Welcome to the Ecohydrology Lab at UCSB!

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The Tague EcoHydrology lab focuses on watershed research, addressing the feedbacks among terrestrial vegetation, surface hydrological processes, and atmospheric conditions. We use a variety of techniques to examine the impact of changes in climate and land use on ecosystem health and water resources.
Please scroll through our blog below to see what we’ve been up to!

All are welcome to attend our weekly lab meetings and take part in presentations and scientific discussions. See our Lab meeting schedule & events page for information on each week’s topic or presenter. Meetings are held in the Bren hall lab wing, room 1005.

Dr. Tague interview on AZoCleantech

Naomi (Christina) Tague was interviewed on AZoCleantech by Alessandro Pirolini, editor of the AZoNetwork, regarding North American forest die-offs that have occurred in recent years. In the interview, Naomi discusses causes and prevention, and the research that grew out of the NCEAS working group and the recent publication that came from that research, “Tree mortality from drought, insects, and their interactions in a changing climate”
Read the interview
Access the paper
National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)
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Tague interview on NPR

Naomi Tague was interviewed by KCLU’s Lance Orozco about drought and tree mortality in California. The interview comes just after the recent publication in New Phytologist, which Dr. Tague is a co-author – “Tree mortality from drought, insects, and their interactions in a changing climate”. The interview was broadcast on National Public Radio on Friday, June 12.

Listen to the interview

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New Publication & Press Release

Dr. Tague, as a member of UC Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), collaborated on a new publication that will appear in New Phytologist this month (an early view of the publication is now available online), “Tree mortality from drought, insects, and their interactions in a changing climate”. The study examines the interactions between drought and insects, and their impact on forest health. Dr. Tague appears in a UCSB press release highlighting the study’s research.

Access the paper
UCSB Press Release
NCEAS

Forest die-off Colo

The western U.S. has been a hotspot for forest die-offs such as this one in Colorado. Photo Credit: William M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management

Figure 1. (a) Cumulative mortality rates (% basal area, BA) four major forest types (below) in western US forests averaged over 2000–2013, with fire-caused mortality removed from US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data. (b) Annual mortality rates (% BA yr−1) of major tree species in the western US from US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data. (c) Field-ascribed proximate cause of mortality that crews noted about individual dead trees in Juniperus osteosperma (JUOS), Pinus edulis (PIED), Pinus contorta (PICO), and Populus tremuloides (POTR) (Supporting Information Notes S1).

Figure 1. (a) Cumulative mortality rates (% basal area, BA) four major forest types (below) in western US forests averaged over 2000–2013, with fire-caused mortality removed from US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data. (b) Annual mortality rates (% BA yr−1) of major tree species in the western US from US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data. (c) Field-ascribed proximate cause of mortality that crews noted about individual dead trees in Juniperus osteosperma (JUOS), Pinus edulis (PIED), Pinus contorta (PICO), and Populus tremuloides (POTR) (Supporting Information Notes S1).

New Publication Accepted!

New publication accepted to Ecohydrology: Peng, H., Tague, C., and Jia, Y. Evaluating the eco-hydrological impacts of reforestation in the Loess Plateau, China using an eco-hydrological model. Access online
Dr. Tague collaborated with PhD student Hui Peng (Key Laboratory of Marine Environment and Ecology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China), using RHESSys to examine the eco-hydrologic responses to reforestation in two neighboring catchments in the Loess Plateau of China. Hui spent some time in the Tague Team Lab in 2012 as a visiting PhD student.

Simulated annual NPP/Biomass patterns for a) FC regrowth and b) FC mature and CC (FC - forested catchment; CC - control catchment)

Simulated annual NPP/Biomass patterns for a) FC regrowth and b) FC mature and CC
(FC – forested catchment; CC – control catchment)

Joint Assembly Presentation

Dr. Naomi Tague was invited to present “Watering Urban Vegetated Patches: Computing Ecologically Useful Runoff Subsidy” at the 2015 AGU Joint Assembly annual meeting (Society partners: American Geophysical Union, Canadian Geophysical Union, Geological Association of Canada, and the Mineralogical Association of Canada) that took place in Montreal Canada May 3-7, 2015.

Detention pond in an urban development in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

Detention pond in an urban development in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

Naomi interviewed on People behind the science

Naomi was interviewed on People behind the Science – where the lives and experiences of the people behind the research and scientific discoveries of today are explored. These podcasts provide access to engaging science stories, amazing insights, seasoned science career advice, and fascinating science research.

Listen to the podcast Scientific Simulations in Stream and Ecosystem Synergies
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New Publication!

RHESSys was used in a paper just published in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology – “Evapotranspiration deficit controls net primary production and growth of silver fir: Implications for Circum-Mediterranean forests under forecasted warmer and drier conditions”. Dr. Tague worked with scientists at the Instituto Pirenaico de Ecologia (Pyrenian Institute of Ecology in Zaragoza, Aragon, Spain), using RHESSys to look at warming induced drought stress on NPP in the Pyrenees.

Click here to access the article

Changes in Annual NPP
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Dr. Tague’s photos from the field site
 

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